Diseases and ConditionsCancers › One-Third of Cancer Deaths Could Be Avoided

One-Third of Cancer Deaths Could Be Avoided

Of the seven million worldwide cancer deaths reported in 2001, 35 percent were attributable to nine well-known behavioral and environmental risk factors, according to an analysis published in The Lancet.

Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and a network of collaborators made the calculation by estimating mortality for 12 types of cancer linked to the nine risk factors in seven World Bank regions for that year.

They also looked at how the risks, and the cancers they cause, were distributed over the regions of the world. This is the first assessment of the role of health risks in
cancer deaths globally and regionally.

Risk Factor Analysis
The researchers analyzed data from the Comparative Risk Assessment project and World Health Organization databases to determine the level of risk factors in different world regions, and separately for men and women.

They also considered how hazardous each risk factor might be. The analysis covered all high-income countries together, and separated low-income and middle-income
countries into geographical regions: East Asia and Pacific, South Asia, Europe and Central Asia, Latin America and Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, and Sub-Saharan Africa.

The nine risk factors:
- overweight and obesity
- low fruit and vegetable intake
- physical inactivity
- smoking
- alcohol use
- unsafe sex
- urban air pollution
- indoor smoke from household use of coal
- contaminated injections in healthcare settings

Alcohol, Smoking Play Large Roles
More than one in every three of the seven million deaths from cancer worldwide were caused by these nine potentially modifiable risk factors (2.43 million), the researchers
found, with alcohol and smoking playing large roles in all income levels and regions.

Worldwide, the nine risk factors caused 1.6 million cancer deaths among men and 830,000 among women. Smoking alone is estimated to have caused 21 percent of deaths from cancer worldwide.

In high-income countries, these nine risks caused 760,000 cancer deaths. Smoking, alcohol, and overweight and obesity were the most important causes of cancer in these nations.

In low- and middle-income regions, the nine risks caused 1.67 million cancer deaths. Smoking, alcohol consumption, and low fruit and vegetable intake were the leading risk factors for these deaths.

Sexual transmission of human papillomavirus is the leading risk factor for cervical cancer in women in low- and middle-income countries, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, where access to cervical screening is also
limited.

Among low- and middle-income regions, Europe and Central Asia had the highest proportion of death from cancer from the nine risk factors studied; 39 percent of 825,000 cancer deaths in the low- and middle-income countries of Europe and Central Asia were caused by these risks.

The effects were even larger among men; one half of cancer deaths among men in the low- and middle-income countries of Europe and Central Asia were caused by these nine risks.

Behaviors and Environments
"These results clearly show that many globally important types of cancer are preventable by changes in lifestyle behaviors and environmental interventions," comments Majid Ezzati, senior author of the study and assistant professor of international health at HSPH.

"To win the war against cancer, we must focus not just on advances in biomedical technologies, but also on technologies and policies that change the behaviors and
environments that cause those cancers," he adds.

The study, "Causes of cancer in the world: comparative risk assessment of nine behavioral and environmental risk factors," was funded by the National Institute on Aging and by the Disease Control Priorities Project.

Article Source: http://www.article-matrix.com

Article By: Rita Jenkins
Views: 1589

Comments On One-Third of Cancer Deaths Could Be Avoided0

Your Comment
Your Name
Your Email

Your Email will not be shown with your comment

Secret Number
61994

Please type the numbers shown above into the Secret Number box.

how does the body maintain blood pressure

maintaining blood pressure

how the body maintains blood pressure

effects of CHD

how is diabetes treated

how does the body respond to high blood pressure

how does the heart maintain blood pressure

introduction of diabetes mellitus

understanding heart rate

how is blood pressure maintained

how does body maintain blood pressure

how does the body maintain normal blood pressure

how body maintains blood pressure

how long can you live with mesothelioma

introduction to diabetes mellitus

50 ways to love your liver

what maintains blood pressure

otolam

does the heart maintain blood pressure

Compare the homeostatic mechanisms that maintain normal blood pressure and heart rate.

social effects of chd

signs of unhealthy eyes

Compare the homeostatic mechanisms that maintain normal blood pressure and heart rate

how to maintain blood pressure

unhealthy eyes

mechanisms that maintain blood pressure

How Does the Body Maintain Blood Pressure?

does the heart help maintain blood pressure

yhsm-inucbr_001

mechanisms to maintain blood pressure

how do arteries aid in maintaining blood pressure

social impacts of CHD

Physiological mechanisms to maintain normal blood pressure

maintain blood pressure

describe the process by which the body maintains normal blood pressure

what maintains blood pressure in body

OSA-OHS

laser treatment for ear infections

how is blood pressure maintained in the body

increase resistance decrease pressure

how does your body maintain blood pressure

diabetes mellitus introduction

understanding your heart rate

otolam procedure

how to save eyesight

effects of CHD on health

osa ohs

how to keep a healthy prostate

how does the body maintain normal blood pressure?

what mechanisms maintain blood pressure